10 tips to protect your kidneys

10 Simple Steps That Will Help You Protect Your Kidneys, Before It’s Too Late!

Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide, radically curtailing their quality of life, with the threat of dialysis or transplantation hanging over their heads.

1. Eat Yoghurt Every Day

Yoghurt contains probiotics (good bacteria) that help your kidneys process waste materials and improve your overall digestive health.

2. Drink Plenty Of Water

Consuming plenty of water and other fluids helps the kidneys clear the sodium, urea and other toxins from the body in a healthy manner. It keeps both the kidneys and the rest of the body healthy.

3. Take Only Kidney-Safe Drugs

Excessive consumption of over-the-counter pills, painkillers and analgesics such as Ibuprofen is not healthy. Some of these drugs can harm the kidneys if consumed on a regular basis. If you have arthritis or a similarly painful condition that requires you to take painkillers frequently, make sure your doctor prescribes your drugs, and not your chemist.

4. Lower Your Phosphorus Intake

If the kidneys aren’t working properly, phosphorus accumulates in the body, causing potentially serious conditions such as bone and heart disorders, and calcification (hardening) of tissues. Avoid consuming products with a high phosphorus content, like carbonated soft drinks and processed foods. You only need 800 – 1,200 mg of phosphorus per day; the extra amount is flushed from the body by healthy kidneys.

5. Eat Healthy

Eating a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables can prevent multiple diseases. Cut down on processed and packaged foods and eat light and fresh. This will also help you avoid foods that are rich in empty calories and reduce your salt intake. If necessary, consult a dietitian about adopting a kidney-friendly diet.

6. Quit Your Harmful Habits

Excessive drinking doesn’t just damage your liver; it also harms your kidneys. Similarly, excessive smoking doesn’t just affect your lungs, but your kidneys as well.

7. Know Your Family Medical History

Awareness can help you be more prepared. Talk to a doctor about whether your family history puts you at a greater risk and what preventive steps you should take in case your parents or relatives have kidney disease. If you are at a greater risk, make sure you get your renal functions tested to know how healthy your kidneys are. Often, people who have no symptoms discover that they have renal disease.

8. Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Under Control

Having diabetes compounds your chances of developing kidney disease. A large number of diabetic patients suffer from kidney failure and need dialysis or organ transplants. It is therefore important that you keep your blood sugar levels under control. It is also important for people with diabetes to get regular kidney function tests to detect any anomalies early. Kidney damage from diabetes can be reduced or prevented if it is detected in time.

9. Manage Your Blood Pressure

Hypertension not only increases your chances of getting a stroke and cardiovascular disease, but it also increases your risk of developing kidney disease. The risk is multiplied if you suffer from diabetes as well. If you have a family history of hypertension and kidney disease, keep a strict check on your blood pressure. Manage it by living a healthy life and strictly adhering to advised medication. Maintain your cholesterol levels.

10. Live An Active Life

Lack of physical activity is the root cause of a large number of lifestyle diseases. Leading sedentary lives makes us more prone to developing hypertension, heart disease, obesity and even diabetes. Pre-diabetics, who are at an increased risk of turning diabetic, can control their blood sugar levels by exercising every day for half an hour. Exercising also helps keep your cholesterol, blood pressure and weight under control. Being overweight increases your risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure, which are major risk factors for kidney disease.

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7 warning signs that you are unhealthy

    1. Bad skin
    2. The quality of your skin is a sure-fire way to get a reading on your overall level of health. Of course, some people struggle with skin issues like acne and are otherwise perfectly fine — but skin quality can clue you in to some bigger problems. A poor diet can really impact your skin quality, and if you’re noticing blemishes like stretch marks? That should tell you that something is wrong.

    3. Sleep issues
    4. Can’t seem to fall asleep at night? That can be an indication that some aspects of your life need adjusting. Whether it be that you’re eating the wrong foods, ingesting too much caffeine late in the day, or not expelling enough energy during the day, not being able to sleep presents an issue — which cascades into further issues.

    5. Bathroom problems
    6. Yep, we’re getting down and dirty. Take note of the color of your urine, and even how frequently you’re going No. 2 — those could both provide important insight into the state of your overall health. Since you’re going to ask, your urine should be a pale yellow color — and hopefully odorless. As for your bowel movement frequency, there’s a wide range. But if you’re going regularly, you’re probably fine. And don’t ignore the grimy details during your investigation.

    7. Lip balm reliance
    8. If your lips are constantly chapped, and you find that you can’t live without lip balm, that’s your body’s way of telling you that something’s wrong. Specifically, your lip condition is an indicator of your vitamin levels. If your lips are chapped, you may be vitamin strapped — so diversify your diet, and get the nutrients you need.

    9. Bad finger and toe nails
    10. If the condition of your lips wasn’t a solid enough indicator, your finger and toe nails can also give you a heads-up if you’re unhealthy. You’re going to want to be on the lookout for ridges, discoloration, and bumps — all of which should be red flags. Your nails can tell you a lot about your overall state of health, so if something is strange, don’t ignore it.

    11. Body temperature fluctuation
    12. Icy feet and hands aren’t normal. Yes, there could be environmental factors at play, but if you’re consistently finding that your extremities are ice cold, it can be a sign of cardiovascular problems. Specifically, cold hands or feet might mean that you’re having circulation issues, and that your body isn’t getting blood where it needs to go. If this is a chronic issue, have it checked out.

    13. A cloudy mind
    14. It’s becoming quite clear that our cognitive ability and brain health are closely tied to our physical condition. That means that obesity and elevated levels of body fat can have a significant impact on our ability to think and reason. It’s kind of scary, but also a very promising area of research. So, if you can’t formulate a potent thought, it may be a sign that it’s time to drop some weight.

6 Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

1. Weakness in Your Arms and Legs

    • If you get weak or numb in your arm, leg, or face, it can be a sign of a stroke especially if it’s on one side of your body.
    • You could also be having a strokeif you can’t keep your balance, feel dizzy, or have trouble walking.
    • Get help quickly if you suddenly can’t see well, get a bad headache, feel confused, or have problems speaking or understanding.

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2. Chest Pain

    • Any chest pain, especially accompanied by sweating, pressure, shortness of breath, or nausea, should be evaluated by a medical professional right away.
    • Chest pain or pressure can be a sign of heart disease or a heart attack, particularly if you feel it after being active. It may also mean that you have a blood clot moving into your lung.
    • If your chest feels tight or heavy, and it lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back again, get help. Don’t try to tough it out.

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3. Tenderness and Pain in the Back of Your Lower Leg

    • This can be a symptom of a blood clot in your leg. It’s called deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. It can happen after you’ve been sitting for a long time, like on a long plane ride, or if you’re sick and have been in bed a long time.
    • If it’s a blood clot, you may feel the pain mostly when you stand or walk. You may also notice swelling.
    • It’s normal to feel tenderness after exercise. But if you also see redness and feel heat where it’s swollen or painful, call your doctor.
    • It’s important to catch a blood clot before it can break off and block your blood flow, which can lead to complications.

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4. Blood in Your Urine

Several things can cause you to see blood when you pee.

    • If you have blood in your urine and you also feel a lot of pain in your side or in your back, you may have kidney stones. A kidney stone is a small crystal made of minerals and salts that forms in your kidney and moves through the tube that carries your urine.
    • Your doctor may take X-rays or do an ultrasound to see the stones. An X-ray uses radiation in low doses to make images of structures inside your body. An ultrasound makes images with sound waves.
    • Many kidney stones eventually pass through your body when you pee. Sometimes your doctor may need to remove the kidney stone.
    • If you see blood in your urine and you also have an increase in feeling that you urgently need to pee, make frequent trips to the bathroom, or feel burning when you urinate, you may have a severe bladder or kidney infection.
    • If you see blood but don’t feel any pain, it may be a sign of kidney or bladder cancer, so visit your doctor.

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5. Wheezing

    • Breathing problems should be treated right away. If you’re wheezing, or hear a whistling sound when you breathe, see your doctor.
    • “Without urgent evaluation, breathing can quickly become labored, and it can be catastrophic if not evaluated and treated quickly.
    • It may be from asthma, a lung disease, a severe allergy, or exposure to chemicals. Your doctor can figure out what’s causing it and how to treat it. If you have asthma, an allergist will create a plan to manage it and reduce flare-ups.
    • Wheezing can also be caused by pneumonia or bronchitis. Are you coughing up yellow or green mucus? Do you also have a fever or shortness of breath? If so, you may have bronchitis that’s turning into pneumonia. “Time to see your doctor.

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6. Suicidal Thoughts

    • If you feel hopeless or trapped, or think you have no reason to live, get help. Talking to a professional can help you make it through a crisis.
    • Go to a hospital emergency room or a walk-in clinic at a psychiatric hospital. A doctor or mental health professional will talk to you, keep you safe, and help you get through this tough time.

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Kidney Failure

Kidney Failure Facts:

    • Kidneys are the organs that help filter waste products from the blood. They are also involved in regulating blood pressure, electrolyte balance, and red blood cell production in the body.
    • Symptoms of kidney failure are due to the build-up of waste products in the body that may cause weakness, shortness of breath, lethargy, and confusion. Inability to remove potassium from the bloodstream may lead to abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death. Initially kidney failure may cause no symptoms.
    • There are numerous causes of kidney failure, and treatment of the underlying disease may be the first step in correcting the kidney abnormality.
    • Some causes of kidney failure are treatable and the kidney function may return to normal. Unfortunately, kidney failure may be progressive in other situations and may be irreversible.
    • The diagnosis of kidney failure usually is made by blood tests measuring BUN, creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR).
    • Treatment of the underlying cause of kidney failure may return kidney function to normal. Lifelong efforts to control blood pressure and diabetes may be the best way to prevent chronic kidney disease and its progression to kidney failure. As we age kidney function gradually decreases over time.
    • If the kidneys fail completely, the only treatment options available may be dialysis or transplant.

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