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1. Zap your stress.

“The biggest issue in most of patients is that they have too much on their plates and want to juggle it all. Stress can have significant health consequences, from infertility to higher risks of depression, anxiety, and heart disease. Find the stress-reduction method that works for you and stick with it.”

2. Stop dieting

“Eating healthy doesn’t mean you have to forgot your favorite piece of chocolate, cake now and then. The key is moderation. Get a mix of lean proteins, healthy fats, smart carbs, and fiber.”

3. Don’t “OVERDOSE” on calcium

“Too much absorbed calcium can increase the risk of kidney stones and may even increase the risk of heart disease. If you’re under 50, shoot for 1,000 milligrams per day, while over-50 women should be getting 1,200 milligrams per day mainly through diet — about three servings of calcium-rich foods such as milk, salmon, and almonds.”

4. Do more than cardio

“Women need a mix of cardio and resistance or weight-bearing exercise at least three to five times a week to help prevent osteoporosis, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Exercise also promotes good self-image, which is really important to a woman’s mental health.”

5. Think about fertility.

“While many women have no problem getting pregnant in their late 30s and even into their early 40s, a woman’s fertility may start to decline as early as 32. So if you want to have kids, talk to your doctor about options, like freezing your eggs.”

6. Appreciate birth control

“Birth control gets a bad rap, but not only can it keep you from getting pregnant before you’re ready, studies show it can lower the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer as well as regulate your cycle.”

7. See your doctor every year

Make sure you get a Pap test to check for cervical cancer every 3 years if you are 21 or older. If you are 30-65, you can get both a Pap test and HPV test every 5 years. Older than that, you may be able to stop testing if your doctor says you are low risk. If you are sexually active and have a higher risk for STDs, get tests for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis yearly. Take an HIV test at least once, more frequently if you’re at risk. Don’t skip your yearly checkup. Your doctor needs to annually assess many other issues such as potential infection, your need for contraception, and sexual complaints.”

8. Have good sex

“Sex reduces stress and may lower the risk of chronic disease — but only if you enjoy it. If anything prevents you from sexual fulfillment, such as dryness or pain, talk to your doctor to find a solution.”

9. Get more sleep.

Sleep needs differ, but if you have trouble getting out of bed, tire easily, or have trouble concentrating, you likely aren’t getting enough. Recent studies suggest this can put you at greater risk of heart disease and psychological problems.”

10. Consider genetic testing

“Doctors can now screen people with a family history of breast cancer,ovarian cancer, and chronic diseases to assess their risk — and then consider preventive measures. Talk to your doctor.”

CLICK HERE to Get Expert Opinion with Our Gynecologist.

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1. Weakness in Your Arms and Legs

    • If you get weak or numb in your arm, leg, or face, it can be a sign of a stroke especially if it’s on one side of your body.
    • You could also be having a strokeif you can’t keep your balance, feel dizzy, or have trouble walking.
    • Get help quickly if you suddenly can’t see well, get a bad headache, feel confused, or have problems speaking or understanding.

For Neurology Consultation CLICK HERE

2. Chest Pain

    • Any chest pain, especially accompanied by sweating, pressure, shortness of breath, or nausea, should be evaluated by a medical professional right away.
    • Chest pain or pressure can be a sign of heart disease or a heart attack, particularly if you feel it after being active. It may also mean that you have a blood clot moving into your lung.
    • If your chest feels tight or heavy, and it lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back again, get help. Don’t try to tough it out.

For Cardiology Consultation CLICK HERE

3. Tenderness and Pain in the Back of Your Lower Leg

    • This can be a symptom of a blood clot in your leg. It’s called deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. It can happen after you’ve been sitting for a long time, like on a long plane ride, or if you’re sick and have been in bed a long time.
    • If it’s a blood clot, you may feel the pain mostly when you stand or walk. You may also notice swelling.
    • It’s normal to feel tenderness after exercise. But if you also see redness and feel heat where it’s swollen or painful, call your doctor.
    • It’s important to catch a blood clot before it can break off and block your blood flow, which can lead to complications.

For General Surgeon Consultation CLICK HERE

4. Blood in Your Urine

Several things can cause you to see blood when you pee.

    • If you have blood in your urine and you also feel a lot of pain in your side or in your back, you may have kidney stones. A kidney stone is a small crystal made of minerals and salts that forms in your kidney and moves through the tube that carries your urine.
    • Your doctor may take X-rays or do an ultrasound to see the stones. An X-ray uses radiation in low doses to make images of structures inside your body. An ultrasound makes images with sound waves.
    • Many kidney stones eventually pass through your body when you pee. Sometimes your doctor may need to remove the kidney stone.
    • If you see blood in your urine and you also have an increase in feeling that you urgently need to pee, make frequent trips to the bathroom, or feel burning when you urinate, you may have a severe bladder or kidney infection.
    • If you see blood but don’t feel any pain, it may be a sign of kidney or bladder cancer, so visit your doctor.

For Urology Consultation CLICK HERE

5. Wheezing

    • Breathing problems should be treated right away. If you’re wheezing, or hear a whistling sound when you breathe, see your doctor.
    • “Without urgent evaluation, breathing can quickly become labored, and it can be catastrophic if not evaluated and treated quickly.
    • It may be from asthma, a lung disease, a severe allergy, or exposure to chemicals. Your doctor can figure out what’s causing it and how to treat it. If you have asthma, an allergist will create a plan to manage it and reduce flare-ups.
    • Wheezing can also be caused by pneumonia or bronchitis. Are you coughing up yellow or green mucus? Do you also have a fever or shortness of breath? If so, you may have bronchitis that’s turning into pneumonia. “Time to see your doctor.

For Pulmonology Consultation CLICK HERE

6. Suicidal Thoughts

    • If you feel hopeless or trapped, or think you have no reason to live, get help. Talking to a professional can help you make it through a crisis.
    • Go to a hospital emergency room or a walk-in clinic at a psychiatric hospital. A doctor or mental health professional will talk to you, keep you safe, and help you get through this tough time.

For Pshycology Consultation CLICK HERE

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SINUSITIS (SINUS INFECTION): SIGN, SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSIS


Sinusitis (sinus infection):

A condition in which the cavities around the nasal passages become inflamed. It is very common more than 10 million cases per year (India).

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Acute sinusitis can be triggered by a cold or allergies and may resolve on its own. Chronic sinusitis lasts up to eight weeks and may be caused by an infection or growths.

Symptoms include headache, facial pain, runny nose and nasal congestion. Acute sinusitis usually doesn’t require any treatment beyond symptomatic relief with pain medications, nasal decongestants and nasal saline rinses. Chronic sinusitis may require antibiotics.

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Symptoms of Sinusitis:

Sinusitis symptoms, whether acute or chronic, frequently develop after a cold or during times of severe or ongoing allergic rhinitis symptoms. The most obvious sign of sinusitis is a painful pressure in the cheeks and forehead.

Other symptoms include:

    • Thick yellow-green nasal discharge
    • Postnasal drip, often with a bad taste
    • Cough
    • Congestion
    • Toothache

In cases of acute sinusitis, a fever may develop.

Diagnosis for Sinusitis:

Allergy testing performed by an allergist / immunologist can identify what allergic triggers might be behind your chronic or reoccurring sinus infections.

In chronic or severe cases, your doctor may also examine your nasal passages using a technique called rhinoscopy or nasal endoscopy. In this procedure, a thin, flexible instrument is inserted up the nostril to view the sinus passages and look for blockages.

Your doctor may order a MRI or CT scan to look for abnormalities in the sinuses – narrow drainage passages, polyps or a deviated septum.

Make an appointment with your doctor right away if you have: a fever, pain or swelling in the face or eye, redness on the cheek or around the eye, severe headaches, confusion or a stiff neck.

CLICK HERE to get an Expert Opinion with Our Best ENT Surgeon in Andhra Pradesh.

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Bad Breath, medically called halitosis, can result from poor dental health habits and may be a sign of other health problems. Bad Breath can also be made worse by the types of foods you eat and other unhealthy lifestyle habits.

How Does What You Eat Affect Breath?

Basically, all the food eaten begins to be broken down in your mouth. As foods are digested and absorbed into the bloodstream, they are eventually carried to your lungs and given off in your breath. If you eat foods with strong odors (such as garlic or onions), brushing and flossing — even mouthwash — merely covers up the odor temporarily. The odor will not go away completely until the foods have passed through your body.

Why Do Poor Habits Cause Bad Breath?

If you don’t brush and floss teeth daily, food particles can remain in your mouth, promoting bacterial growth between teeth, around the gums, and on the tongue. This causes bad breath. Antibacterial mouth rinses also can help reduce bacteria.

In addition, odor-causing bacteria and food particles can cause bad breath if dentures are not properly cleaned.

Smoking or chewing tobacco-based products also can cause bad breath, stain teeth, reduce your ability to taste foods, and irritate your gums.

What Health Problems Are Associated With Bad Breath?

Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth may be a warning sign of gum (periodontal) disease. Gum disease is caused by the buildup of plaque on teeth. Bacteria cause the formation of toxins to form, which irritate the gums. If gum disease continues untreated, it can damage the gums and jawbone.
Other dental causes of bad breath include poorly fitting dental appliances, yeast infections of the mouth, and dental caries (cavities).

The medical condition dry mouth (also called xerostomia) also can cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque, and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Dry mouth may be a side effect of various medications, salivary gland problems, or continuous breathing through the mouth.

Many other diseases and illnesses may cause bad breath. Here are some to be aware of: respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis, chronic sinusinfections, postnasal drip, diabetes, chronic acid reflux, and liver or kidney problems.

What Can I Do to Prevent Bad Breath?

Bad breath can be reduced or prevented if you:

    1. Practice good oral hygiene. Brush twice a day withfluoride toothpaste to remove food debris and plaque. Brush teeth after you eat (keep a toothbrush at work or school to brush after lunch). Don’t forget to brush the tongue, too. Replace your toothbrush every 2 to 3 months or after an illness. Use floss or an interdental cleaner to remove food particles and plaque between teeth once a day. Rinse with an antibacterial mouthwash twice a day. Dentures should be removed at night and cleaned thoroughly before being placed in your mouth the next morning.
    2. See your dentist regularly — at least twice a year. He or she will conduct an oral exam and professional teeth cleaning and will be able to detect and treat periodontal disease, dry mouth, or other problems that may be the cause of bad mouth odor.
    3. Stop smoking and chewing tobacco-based products. Ask your dentist for tips on kicking the habit.
    4. Drink lots of water. This will keep your mouth moist. Chewing gum (preferably sugarless) or sucking on candy (preferably sugarless) also stimulates the production of saliva, which helps wash away food particles and bacteria. Gums and mints containing xylitol are best.
    5. Keep a log of the foods you eat. If you think they may be causing bad breath, bring the log to your dentist to review. Similarly, make a list of the medications you take. Some drugs may play a role in creating mouth odors.

Who Treats Bad Breath?

In most cases, your dentist can treat the cause of bad breath. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy and the odor is not of oral origin, you may be referred to your family doctor or to a specialist to determine the odor source and treatment plan. If the odor is due to gum disease, for example, your dentist can either treat the disease or refer you to a periodontist, a dentist who specializes in treating gum conditions.

What Products Can I Use to Eliminate Bad Breath?

An antiseptic mouthwash can help eliminate bacteria that cause bad breath. Ask your dentist about which product is best for you.

CLICK HERE to Get Expert Opinion with Our Dental Specialists.

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Kidney Failure Facts:

    • Kidneys are the organs that help filter waste products from the blood. They are also involved in regulating blood pressure, electrolyte balance, and red blood cell production in the body.
    • Symptoms of kidney failure are due to the build-up of waste products in the body that may cause weakness, shortness of breath, lethargy, and confusion. Inability to remove potassium from the bloodstream may lead to abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death. Initially kidney failure may cause no symptoms.
    • There are numerous causes of kidney failure, and treatment of the underlying disease may be the first step in correcting the kidney abnormality.
    • Some causes of kidney failure are treatable and the kidney function may return to normal. Unfortunately, kidney failure may be progressive in other situations and may be irreversible.
    • The diagnosis of kidney failure usually is made by blood tests measuring BUN, creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR).
    • Treatment of the underlying cause of kidney failure may return kidney function to normal. Lifelong efforts to control blood pressure and diabetes may be the best way to prevent chronic kidney disease and its progression to kidney failure. As we age kidney function gradually decreases over time.
    • If the kidneys fail completely, the only treatment options available may be dialysis or transplant.

CLICK HERE to Get Expert Advice from Our Best Nephrologists in Andhra Pradesh.

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